Wednesday, 4 September 2013

FRIDAY FICTIONEERS - ROCHELLE'S MUSEUM - MY 100 WORDS BY LINDA PALUND


ROCHELLE’S MUSEUM

            “We have a museum.” Declared Rochelle, as we clumped home in our playsuits.  We were allowed outside for one hour each day.
            She opened a heavy door in their storeroom. 
            “It’s beautiful!”
            I couldn’t tell her how sad it made me.
            Wolf Creek was 100 miles away, but when the tornado hit the Power Plant, it spun these radioactive toys all the way to Kansas City.
            Rochelle’s and my dad were ‘pessimists’.  They built lead-lined storm shelters beneath our homes on Stateline Road.
            Later, in Hazmat suits, they collected the memories of the dead children, sealing them behind leaded glass.

·       This Dabble in FLASH FICTION is from FRIDAY FICTIONEERS courtesy of:
·       ·      http://rochellewisofffields.wordpress.com/2013/09/04/6-september-2013/
·       and you can comment on mine below:

38 comments:

  1. Great how this story builds - the meaning of 'clumped home' and only being allowed out for one hour a day, isn't apparent until later.

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    1. Thank you for that. It's nice to know someone is reading my stuff in a good way.

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  2. Dear Lindaura,

    How many ways can you say "creepy'? How did you find out about my dad? Who told?

    As a matter of fact I grew up within three miles of State Line Rd. Don't live too far from it now.
    Interesting story line.
    Nice one.

    Shalom,

    Rochelle

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  3. Dear Lindaura,

    Your story is going to come true. May have already in Japan.

    Are you still in Greece?

    Aloha,

    Doug

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    1. Hi, Doug. Thanks. I keep writing these true stories based on that book BOMBSHELL (James Reich) which definitely blew me away. I have been so wrapped up in my own life, I didn't pay attention to what has already happened in places like Japan, and what can still happen, until now, although I have always been against Nuclear Power Plants, I was never an activist...
      And I am still in Greece, still in Athens, whilst Charley/Carlos toils at home in Bath.
      Aloha

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  4. This was creepy. Love the last line.
    Tom

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    1. Thanks, Tom. Glad you appreciated it.

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  5. This is definitely intriguing, I like it.

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  6. A dystopian future, or maybe a dystopian present in Fukushima.

    Very well done.

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  7. Hi Linda,
    I see inspiration struck quickly and you posted early. You and the muse must be very simpatico. I liked the part about keeping your feelings to yourself and not always being an open book (special metaphor for a writer). And the toys of dead children? It would be hard to come up with a sadder and more touching interpretation of this image. Ron

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    1. Actually, I think you are kind of right. I clicked on Rochelle's page early, by accident or serendipity, and loved that collection of hers and had to write something right away. Thank you for like it.
      I also wanted to write about this, but I didn't:
      http://openfileblog.blogspot.gr/2012/08/susan-hiller-from-freud-museum.html

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  8. Very moving and beautifully executed. Well done

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    1. Thank you , Sandra. Those boxes were just too fascinating. I bet we could write more than 36 stories about them...

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  9. This is an intriguing story.

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  10. This was very creepy and I didn't feel the full effect until I read it through with the new understanding of what was going on. Very dark.
    If you haven't already seen this, you need to -- it is much reflective of the story you wrote: http://youtu.be/hqJ8hFgYwVg

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    1. Damn. I couldn't upload the film here in Athens. Said it was not availabe in my country. How the hell do they know where I am. Could you give me the title. I love Sigur Ros.
      And Thank you for the nice comments, darling...

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  11. A nuclear holocaust... very eerie

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  12. Wow! all I have to worry about is when the pig farm is upwind of my house! clever use of the prompt. :)

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    1. Oh, but let me give you lots more things to worry about...and thank you for enjoying it.

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  13. too close to the truth / very nicely written
    was recently in a chat about nuclear stations - ughhh

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    1. So here is the problem. An author friend of mine, who actually is a real published author, asked me to review his latest book, BOMBSHELL, by James Reich, and it had an enormous effect on me. All the knowledge and beliefs we held that we have to forget in order to continue with our lives, came flooding back to me. The book hit me like a bombshell, literally.

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  14. My wife worries about the nuclear power plant in Russellville, about 60 miles south as the crow flies. The prevailing wind is always from the south. This was an eerie story, but an excellent use of the prompt.

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    1. Thanks Russell. So evidently, you are not the owner of that plant in Russellville...It is a scary scenario as many of our nuclear power plants are ageing - and where does all that waste go? And what happens with the combination of global warming changing the weather and storms getting worse and our power plants upwind and upstream from us.
      It is one of the reasons I moved from Portland Oregon.
      Well actually, it was the only reason...

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  15. Excellent and sad as well Linda. Enjoyed your post

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  16. this was very frightening. and well executed. great work.

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  17. I love the way it starts so matter of fact and childlike and then becomes frightening, scary and very worrying. Well done
    Dee

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    1. Thank you for appreciating the set up.

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  18. That definately makes one think. Great story.

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    1. Thank you for appreciating my gloomy world view.

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    1. Gosh, I don't know if I should thank you for appreciating this - but yes, I guess I wrote it to be disturbing...

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  20. Adult devastation and childish hope, intertwined to perfection. Nicely done!

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    1. Thanks for that. I didn't expect anymore visitors, but I am glad you stopped by.

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  21. Second one I've read about a tornado. Nuclear toys? Disturbing indeed. This story would make a wonderful book.

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  22. Thank you, Shirley. Happily, someone else has already written a not very happy book which inspired this - BOMBSHELL, by James Reich. It was just published a few months ago and available on Amazon, as well as on request from your local bookstore.

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